Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Libraries Lead: Showcasing the North Baker Research Library’s collections

The role of the research library in a special collections archive often poses a problem: how do we support access to our collections when we are open limited days, and when, in order to protect and preserve our often fragile materials, collections cannot leave our reading room?

Here at the California Historical Society, we know that to succeed in our mission of making our State’s history part of the lives of contemporary Californians, we needed to make our collections accessible in ways that went beyond the traditional reference library. By including our unique materials in exhibitions and public programs, in publications and on social media, we are able to provide people far greater, and more varied, opportunities to interact with the wonderful photographs, manuscripts, maps, and rare books that make up our collections.

Here is a glimpse into some of the projects staff are working on currently:

Thursday, March 1, 2018

#onthisday 50 years ago, the East L.A. Walkouts Began



#Onthisday 50 years ago, the influential East L.A. School Walkouts (Blowouts) began, transforming the Chicano movement in Los Angeles. 

Over two weeks, tens of thousands of young Latino students took to the streets to protest conditions in their schools on the East Los Angeles. In many ways, the walkouts (primarily at Wilson, Roosevelt, Garfield, Belmont and Lincoln high schools) were the first public display of an urban Chicano rights movement that had begun among California farm workers in the previous several years. The walkouts were the first mass mobilization of Mexican-Americans in Southern California. 

The East L.A. Walkouts and their impact are being remembered through over the next couple of weeks in a range of ways, from conferences to news articles. See some of these efforts below

http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-1968-east-la-walkouts-20180301-htmlstory.html

http://laschoolreport.com/50-years-after-the-walkouts-los-angeles-latino-students-are-still-fighting-for-educational-equity/

https://www.scpr.org/news/2018/03/01/81235/fifty-years-ago-thousands-walked-out-of-east-la-sc/

https://la.curbed.com/maps/east-los-angeles-walkouts-history

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-arellano-blowouts-20180228-story.html 

https://www.kcet.org/shows/departures/east-la-blowouts-walking-out-for-justice-in-the-classrooms

http://www.boyleheightsbeat.com/cal-state-la-marks-50th-anniversary-of-east-l-a-walkouts-19432/

http://www.calstatela.edu/univ/ppa/publicat/walkin-2018

https://achieve.lausd.net/site/Default.aspx?PageID=14359


https://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/50th-Anniversary-of-East-LA-Walkouts-Highlights-Student-Activism-475609353.html

http://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2018/03/01/1968-walkouts-50th-anniversary/

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/opinion-sanchez-east-la-walkouts_us_5a981ef2e4b07dffeb708bc5

http://www.latimes.com/local/education/la-me-edu-walkout-anniversary-garfield-20180228-story.html 

https://home.lausd.net/apps/news/article/829816

https://daily.jstor.org/the-activist-students-of-1960s-east-los-angeles/?

Thursday, February 8, 2018

Who Tells Your Story? California Historical Society Extends Exhibitions about Colonial Histories on the East and West Coasts

The California Historical Society (CHS) has announced that it will extend its current exhibitions--- bringing the complex story of Alexander Hamilton to San Francisco as part of an initiative showcasing two versions of the United States’ colonial history: English and Spanish---through March 18th!



The cornerstone of this historical presentation are two simultaneous exhibitions, Alexander Hamilton: Treasures from the New-York Historical Society, which examines the life and prolific career of now-popular American statesman Alexander Hamilton (c. 1755–1804) and his lasting influence on shaping the foundation of the modern United States, and Meanwhile Out West: Colonizing California, 17691821, which explores Spanish Colonial California during the period of Hamilton’s life. 


Together, these two exhibitions present, side-by-side, two versions of the United States’ colonial history, British and Spanish. Realigning the frame of American history beyond the revolutionary thirteen colonies, symbolized by the story of Alexander Hamilton, we include the complicated Spanish colonial and Native Californian world along the Pacific Coast. In doing so, the exhibitions implicitly ask the questions: Who tells the story of the United States? Who tells the story of California?


The exhibitions are on view through March 18, 2018 at the California Historical Society, 678 Mission Street, San Francisco, .